Mental Illness Do you ever feel embarrassed or ashamed of your mental illness..?

 

Lee

Can't get enough...!
Community Leader
This is something that comes up for me quite frequently. I am often in situations, usually at work, where my mental illness becomes embarrassing.

I work in a predominantly male environment which makes things like dealing with anxiety and panic attacks quite tricky.

I know deep down that these aren’t really my hang-ups and things can never change unless I am vocal, but it can be difficult.
 

cazcat

Member
I have felt self conscious over the wounds I suffered and the fact people would stare so I have always covered up. If swimming I would wear a one piece while everyone else was in a two peice as for showing off my belly, not a chance, I just didn't know how to answer their questions and they would look at me which then provoked more questions many of which I just didn't want to answer as it would bring back flash backs and serious anxiety.

Today, I'm much better I have come to terms with my ordeal and walk around freely and if people ask and can't understand the answer then it is tough. I am very proud about coming through my problems and I feel every little hurdle is a win.
 
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cazcat

Member
This is something that comes up for me quite frequently. I am often in situations, usually at work, where my mental illness becomes embarrassing.

I work in a predominantly male environment which makes things like dealing with anxiety and panic attacks quite tricky.

I know deep down that these aren’t really my hang-ups and things can never change unless I am vocal, but it can be difficult.
For me there're physical scars so not something I can easily hide.
 
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Dave

Member
I'm not sure how to respond to this issue as I don't believe that I have a mental illness (I might have, but just don't realise it) but I do have physical disabilities that some who suffer the same may feel embarrassed by their inabilities to do what healthy people can do without even thinking about it.

If we are struck down by something, then we have to try and create a balanced atmosphere around ourselves that ensures that we understand our limitations and frustrations, but just as important that those around us and who have to live and work with us also understand our limitations and frustrations and how we can often lash out through sheer frustration. It's never really anything personal against any individual or group of people, just that we have ailments that require understanding and not revulsion.

There have been times when I used to feel embarrassed because I couldn't get into a taxi because it was too high, or not being able to manoeuvre around an obstacle - now I tend to make a joke of it to lighten the mood. I'm not sure if such an attitude could be applied to someone with mental illness. I believe that people need to assess what is meant by mental illness before being judgemental. There are many forms of mental illness and I suppose it can be scary for some people who have to deal with someone else's afflictions when they don't understand what is wrong.

Support and understanding go a long way and if more people took the time to realise this, then perhaps embarrassing situations could be avoided.
 
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Part of my fear is having a panic attack in a very public setting. The thought alone gives me anxiety. I feel like people will either look at me like I am crazy or overreact thinking I am having a heart attack or something which would make my anxiety worse. It sucks feeling like this.
 
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